Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 4.25 to 8.2 million people in the United States are living with chronic hepatitis B (HBV) or chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. About 850,000 to 2.2 million people have HBV, and an additional 3.4 to 6 million people have chronic HCV. It is estimated that 45 to 85% of persons with HCV are unaware of their infection.

All identified forms of viral hepatitis are reportable to Iowa HHS as mandated by Iowa Code section 139A.3. Due to the infectious nature of each form of viral hepatitis, it is necessary that each case be reported so that prevention and control efforts may be initiated by Iowa HHS.

For questions related to reporting of HCV contact: Shane Scharer, Hepatitis Data Coordinator at (515) 657-1129

Iowa HHS performs surveillance follow up calls on Iowans diagnosed with hepatitis C under the age of 40.

The ABCs of Hepatitis

Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 4.25 to 8.2 million people in the United States are living with chronic hepatitis B (HBV) or chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. About 850,000 to 2.2 million people have HBV, and an additional 3.4 to 6 million people have chronic HCV. It is estimated that 45 to 85% of persons with HCV are unaware of their infection.

All identified forms of viral hepatitis are reportable to Iowa HHS as mandated by Iowa Code section 139A.3. Due to the infectious nature of each form of viral hepatitis, it is necessary that each case be reported so that prevention and control efforts may be initiated by Iowa HHS.

 Reporting of Hepatitis C

  1. Screening tests:
    • Anti-HCV: Positive or reactive
  2. Confirmatory tests:
    • HCV RNA, NAT, or PCR: Positive or reactive test results
    • HCV RNA, NAT, or PCR: Negative or not detected test results
    • Genotyping: Detected or not detected results

Medical providers who diagnose patients with HCV and laboratories who find positive results are required to report. Many laboratories now have automated processes (e.g., Electronic Laboratory Reporting) to report their results. The technology for automated reporting directly from medical providers is not fully developed at this time.

All identified forms of viral hepatitis are reportable to Iowa HHS as mandated by Iowa Code section 139A.3. Due to the infectious nature of each form of viral hepatitis, it is necessary that each case be reported so that prevention and control efforts may be initiated by Iowa HHS.